Leave a Trail of Happy Clients Behind You

By Mike Ames (The Mike Ames Business Development Blog)

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1. Always do what’s best for the client.

Short term gain, long term loss or short term loss and long term gain? Your call of course but personally I always aim for the latter.

If you’re in sales and people have a need it’s not too hard to get them to take your option and if that’s the right thing for them to do well fine but if it isn’t say so and move on.

Only a few days ago I was speaking to somebody who I wanted to come on my Business Growth Programme but when she outlined what else she was doing in her business it was obvious to me that taking on the overhaul and upgrade of her BD capability would have been too much and I told her so. Lost the deal but hopefully gained another layer of trust.

2. Be great at what you do.

An obvious thing to say but not one that always translates easily into reality. Too many of us settle for “getting by” especially when we have all sorts of time/money/people/project pressures dragging us down. Occasionally all of us (definitely me included) succumb to this and do second best work.

A tick-box “that’s done let’s move on to the next” mentality does not create delighted clients. The question to ask is “If I were the client would I be thrilled with what I just did for me?” – if the answer is no you know what to do next.

3. Always make your clients feel good.

Never belittle them, bamboozle them with jargon, say you’ll do something and then don’t, make them feel out of control, overload them with things you can do instead and finally never under any circumstances go back on a verbal promise you made.

I can almost imagine you reading this and shaking your heads in disgust at the very thought that you would do those things. The truth is we all do them from time to time it’s just that we’re usually too busy to notice.

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You’ve Had Lunch, Now What?

By Adrian Miller (SalesGravy.com)

Are you one of the countless individuals guilty of having an impressive list of contacts and not using it effectively? Don’t be ashamed. You’re in good company. Many professionals, including lawyers, doctors, CPAs and a whole array of others, are notorious for this.


images (1)Did you meet an interesting individual at the last networking lunch? Or, maybe you were recently introduced to someone at a neighbor’s party who could very well be a viable prospect. In these networking-focused times, you’re probably introduced to lots of people at a variety of formal networking events, informal get-togethers, and through online sources.

Sure, it’s important to have a healthy list of contacts. But, a list you never utilize is rather useless. If you’re not staying on the grid and keeping in contact, you’re missing out on valuable opportunities to gather new customers and grow your business.  Like with certain other things in life, it’s not the size that counts, it’s what you do with it. This adage certainly applies to contact lists.
Are you one of the countless individuals guilty of having an impressive list of contacts and not using it effectively? Don’t be ashamed. You’re in good company. Many professionals, including lawyers, doctors, CPAs and a whole array of others, are notorious for this.
So, if staying connected is so important, why doesn’t everyone stay in touch? The majority of excuses frequently used can be broken down into four main categories. Perhaps, one or more of these will sound familiar to you.

The Real Reason You Should Practice Your Sales Pitches

By Linda Richardson (The Sales Thought Leaders Blog)

Presenting sales pitches can be a nerve-racking experience for anyone, even those who sell products for a living. Everyone says practicing the sales pitch will make things go smoothly. Yes, that may be true, but it is only half the truth. Practicing sales pitches not only requires practicing what you’re going to say, but it also requires you to receive feedback on the content, delivery, and structure of the pitch. […Continue Reading…]

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Salesjournal Interview: Evolution of Sales Training with The Brooks Group’s Will Brooks

Will Brooks from The Brooks Group

Will Brooks

Salesjournal.com sits down with Will Brooks, Executive Vice President and Director of Marketing for The Brooks Group, to discuss how the trends in sales are affecting organizations and how they can leverage sales training and assessments to improve the performance of their sales teams.

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Mistakes Are Better Than Regrets

By Tibor Shanto – tibor.shanto@sellbetter.ca (Renbor Sales Solutions Inc.)

If I had a dollar for every time I heard a sales person say “I should have …”, I could start working a three day week. And for all the coulda shmoudas, the risk for not acting was not that much greater than not acting, but the rewards always measurably bigger. I have never understood how some can live better with the regret of not having gotten a sale because they did not act, versus worrying about not getting an account because of a mistake they made attempting.

We worry about making mistakes when it comes to accounts, or meetings, usually unnecessarily so, and usually due to a lack of a proper pursuit plan, or process. Process here refers to a set of necessary and common-sense activities required to move the sale to close, executed in a logical and sequential stages, not something overly complex just for the sake of being complex, or more expensive. But the ‘process’ is not the end all and be all, as many mistakenly believe, it is the jumping point, the platform that allows you to act and measure progress and recalibrate when needed, but none of that matters till you act. It is when you act and make mistakes that you can correct, vary, and act again. Mistakes can be corrected, regrets you just carry around like so much luggage.

images (1)This unfolds with meetings as well, I often hear sales people say after the fact “I should have asked…” So why don’t they? One simple reason, they didn’t write their questions down in advance, and simply forgot, they didn’t want to look amateurish, but many buyers tell me they just see that as being prepared. More often sellers tell me they didn’t want to sound foolish asking such a simple question. What’s the old question: “do you want to be rich or look cool?”

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What Recruiters Look for in Sales Resumes

pile of resumesAfter posting a new position on a job board or company website, you will often become inundated with resumes, phone calls and emails. It can be time consuming and tedious to sort through the large volume of resumes and inquiries, even with a large staff. Use these 3 indicators to discern top sales talent from candidate resumes and determine whether a candidate will move forward in the hiring process, or get moved into the ‘no’ pile.

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