Psychological Tips to Improve a Sales Presentation

By Toke Kruse  (CEO of Slideshop.com)

Of course the primary motivation behind any sales presentation is … yes, sales. No surprise there. Sales are the reason for all your research, preparation and practice. And when your presentation materials are put together, they should forward your brand and convince the audience to try what you’re offering. Unfortunately, though, even though making sales is the objective, some presenters come across too “salesy.” They’re so assertive or insincere that they give an impression of being superficial and self-serving. That loses an audience (and sales) very quickly.

So how do you deliver a sales presentation that makes a positive impact? One tip is to explore human behavioral studies that explain how and why persuasion takes place.

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The Effect of Poor Customer Service and What to Do About It

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Although we all know that bad customer service hurts a business, this fact is made much more realistic and understandable by the monetary loss a business suffers from poor customer service. US enterprises lose an estimated $83 billion as a result of poor customer service. Could your business be suffering and losing money because of your customer service?

This new white paper details the scary real world figures that poor customer service causes but we also present detailed steps for you to carry out that will help improve your customer service and keep your customers happy.
Read on to discover:

  • Myths of customer service
  • Up-to-date data on how and why customers are affected by customer service
  • How to use channels, technology, and other strategic choices to improve your customer service

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4 Must Dos For Sales and Marketing Pros

By Melissa Madian ORACLE | eloqua

“I know I need to be unique and different when talking to customers; but I don’t know how?”

I had just finished running a sales training session for a group of major account reps, SJPwhen a colleague came up to me and very quietly uttered the above quote.  He was clearly embarrassed, lost and distraught. It got me thinking: if he was willing to sidle up to me and admit this distress; how many others were feeling the same but were too shy or embarrassed to come forward to talk about how to address it?

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How to Prepare for a Valuable Sales Discovery Session

By Brian Walsh (Business 2 Community)

SJP

Know Where You’re Going. Understand Where You’ve Been.

If you want to truly understand how you can help your client, you need to assess what you know. A call with someone you’ve never met before is very different than one where you have some background. This may seem like an elementary point, but I’ve seen way too many salespeople approach all their discovery calls the same way. As a result, they miss opportunities to change their conversation in a way that connects them to buyer value drivers. The prep is critical for many reasons, and it starts with two simple questions:

  1. Where am I in the account?
  2. Where am I not?

Remember the “Who”

Effective preparation doesn’t end there. A lot of salespeople make the mistake by only asking those questions. They focus their discovery only on the account white space, or if it’s a new account, where they think they have the biggest chance of making a sale. That information is important, but you need to consider the “who.”

Research from CSO Insights shows that three or more individuals are involved in the final B2B buying decision. Your challenge as a salesperson is to articulate your solution’s value and differentiation in a way that shows the business impact to each of these decision makers. You won’t be successful in showing your business impact to this key group if you don’t follow an effective discovery process.

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Sales Leaders – How They Unknowingly Hinder Innovation

By Richard Ruff (Sales Training Connection)

In a wide variety of industries, companies are experiencing transformational changes.  These changes are driven by global competition, technological changes, government regulations and the dynamics of an unstable economy.  As a result companies’ expectations concerning their suppliers are changing – what they buy, how they buy, and what they are willing to pay for it are all in a state of flux.

SJP

 

Viewed from the other side of the fence, it means vendors are unlikely to prosper if they view improvement simply as doing a better job doing what they are doing – innovation is required.

 

 

 

The subject of innovation dominates the technology sphere.  Articles on “wearable technology” like Apple’s much-hyped iWatch are easy to find.  Likewise in sales most of discussion related to innovation is about technology.  Lots of interest and dialogue on empowering your sales force through technology or the ten new mobile apps for igniting sales.

However, if companies are going to take innovation seriously and do more than just manipulate the status quo, then new technologies are just part of the solution – not the entire story.

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