Tag Archives: Sales growth

5 Steps to Summer Pipeline Building

 By: Ken Thoreson (SalesGravy.com)

What kinds of programs or activity are you launching in the next 30 days to make sure your summer is busy? SJP

I have simply built a list to help you think through your options, and I would like our readers to certainly add their thoughts and ideas as well.  Let’s all work together to ensure mutual success.

1.    Hunt your customer base: hold Customer Appreciate events, make sure your have a plan to contact each customer and offer additional products/services.

2.    Ask your vendors for idea’s and find out what other organizations are using to increase activity

3.    Schedule events for regional access; if you cover a large area or even a single city, schedule morning events in two separate areas, one day apart.   One might be on the North side of your city, the second in the South-as an example. As you prospect, make sure prospects know of both events-makes it easy for them to attend.

4.    Buy a new database and create a fun mailing and use over-sized post cards.

5.    Have each salesperson block a minimum of two hours a week to prospect fresh opportunities.

These are just a few to start the dialogue; the key is to make it happen-Now!

What are your ideas?

Who Really Achieves Success in Sales?

By Mark Hunter (“The Sales Hunter”)

Success in sales does not go to the one who has the lowest price. Nor does success in sales go to the one who has the best customers. And, success in sales does not go the one who has the most intelligence.

Who really achieves success in sales? The people who practice integrity with every person with whom they come in contact.  There is no substitute – no alternative – to consistent integrity.

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SJP

4 Fixes for Flimsy Sales Forecasts

By Dan McDade (SMM Sales & Marketing Management)

Sales forecasts impact much more than sales management – they have a direct bearing on overall performance, marketing and sales budgets, and planning for service and product delivery, to name a few.

SJPToo often, flimsy sales forecasts increase risk in all those areas. In this context, forecasts are flimsy when they are inaccurate, lack visibility or fail to deliver the right number of correctly qualified leads needed to support target numbers.

Fortunately, there are four clear fixes that make sales forecasts more accurate and robust.      […Continue Reading…]

Less Painful Prospecting Activities

By Dario Priolo (Richardson Sales Training & Strategy Execution)

Prospecting is one of those activities that you either love or hate. For most people in sales, it’s unavoidable. Those who hate it generally suffer from “prospecting procrastination,” which is when a person will seek out any kind of busy work in an effort to put off and avoid the dreaded task.

Perhaps it is loathed because it rarely (if ever) yields immediate gratification. Others can’t handle the hang-ups and rejection. Whatever the reason, sales reps must realize the importance of prospecting to building and sustaining a pipeline that will pay off down the road — depending on your sales cycle length. SJP

Whether you’re gung-ho or reluctant, when you dedicate time to prospecting, you want to choose prospecting activities that will give you the greatest payoff. The best way to start is to view the world from your prospect’s perspective. Put yourself in their shoes to see just how likely you would be to respond to your own inquiry.

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Anticipatory Selling: Tips to Stay One Step Ahead of Your Buyer

By  (KITEDESK INSIGHTS)

(This post originally appeared on www.customerthink.com)

These days it appears that B2B buyers are firmly in the driver’s seat. Equipped with Google search, online forums and easy access to trusted thought leaders and peers, they favor discovering answers themselves, completing some 60 to 70 percent of their decision process before contacting a single vendor.

Sales leaders are being held back by the belief that they have to react to technological change in order to keep up with the buyer. But it’s not about reacting– it’s about anticipating. To take a page from Wayne Gretzky’s playbook: good salespeople meet their buyers where they are; great salespeople meet their buyers where they are going to be.SJP

Salespeople must have better data about their buyer than their buyer has about them. This enables a seller to anticipate a buyer’s next move, and engage that buyer around value-added data or content that will influence their decision making process as they move forward.

Prospects in the very early stages tend not to respond well to a sales offer, but as Heinz Marketing president Matt Heinz explains, “They will respond to advice. Help. A link to a best practice article. Someone who helps them discover and self-educate. The source of that information has a leg-up in a sales process that hasn’t begun, but where the prospect is already becoming qualified and establishing solution preferences.”

I call this anticipatory selling.

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Deepak Chopra Shares 7 Insights to Double Sales Productivity

By  (Salesforce Blog)

Perhaps, you start early, work late, and check email on weekends – but still don’t have the level of results you planned to achieve.  It may not be your work ethic that’s holding you back. It could be your state of well-being.

SJPAt last year’s DreamforceDeepak Chopra revealed key insights on the past, present and future of well-being and its relationship to performance.

Here are seven teachings from the talk and his books plus ways to leverage these learnings to increase sales productivity.

 

Is it Ever “The Right Time” for Your Buyer ?

By Tibor Shantotibor.shanto@sellbetter.ca (Renbor Sales Solutions Inc.)

SJP

If you prospect regularly, a common push back you get from potential buyers is “it’s not a good time”, or “the timing is wrong”, or any variations on that theme.  In some instances it makes sense, calling an accounting firm in the March April timeframe, or a school supply company in August; these are times those companies are busy executing, having made purchase decisions much earlier in the cycle.

With only 15% or so of your market being in play, that is actively out there “buying”, and 70% being in what is commonly called Status Quo, ostensibly not looking, it is a safe bet that 70% of the “time” the timing is not right.  I say ostensibly, because there is a lot of opportunity and buyers to be found in that large group called Status Quo, the fact that they are satisfied with their current state, does not mean they won’t buy, no matter what some pundits tell you.  Satisfied is a long way away from ecstatic; there is a lot of room for improvement and your offering between those two points, don’t settle for satisfied.  The problem is that too many sales people allow the statement about timing to throw them off or give up on an opportunity, not just for themselves, but for the buyer, and by extension the buyer’s company and objectives.

“75% of customers who leave or switch vendors for a competitor, when asked, say they were ‘satisfied or completely satisfied’ with the vendor they left, at the time they switched.”  ‘Customer Loyalty Guaranteed’ Bell & Patterson

What the Status Quo prospect is saying is that they don’t have time to waste on another value proposition, or you history of accomplishments.  They want to know how to move past satisfied, which you could do if you could surface their objectives, and what they feel is in the way.

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